MOM continues to make investments in U.S. Flag niche market

Completed: American Phoenix Tanker…616 feet long and 105 feet wide…
Follow it's construction, launch and official christening celebration.

MidOcean Tanker Company

BAE Systems Completes American Phoenix Tanker

BAE Systems in Mobile, Alabama joined with Mid Ocean Tanker Company (MOTC) to complete and commission the American Phoenix, a U.S.-flagged, Jones Act-qualified chemical tanker. Measuring 616 feet long and 105 feet wide, the American Phoenix is the largest vessel ever built and launched in the State of Alabama. It has a laden draft of 36 feet and a cargo capacity of 49,000 dwt.

BAE Systems was contracted to complete construction of the American Phoenix and prepare it for use. The vessel is owned by MOTC, a joint venture between Mid Ocean Marine and private equity firm Alterna Capital Partners. Sea trials and delivery are scheduled to occur this month. The vessel will conduct trade initially in the Gulf of Mexico.

The American Phoenix build demonstrates BAE Systems' continued growth in the commercial shipbuilding market. The Mobile yard has already begun its next project, which is to build an 8,500 cubic yard capacity trailing suction hopper dredge for Weeks Marine, Inc. That vessel, named MV Magdalen, is scheduled to be finished in 2014. When complete, it will measure 340 feet long and 79 feet wide, with a draft of 27 feet.

American Phoenix, largest vessel launched from Alabama (See time lapse video)

On October 18th, BAE Systems' shipyard in Mobile, Alabama performed the successful translation of the American Phoenix from land to dry dock. Measuring 616 feet long and 105 feet wide, the American Phoenix is the largest vessel ever launched from the State of Alabama. It has a draft of 36 feet and a cargo capacity of 49,000 dwt.

The translation required detailed planning and was conducted using a highly successful full-teaming approach with neighboring shipbuilder Huntington Ingalls Industries. Huntington Ingalls provided a team of operators and 118 self-propelled translation cars, which supported the weight of the vessel in order to transfer it to the dry dock.